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HAYES HDX LOGGING TRUCK GM V12 C/W 13 SPEED - 91000 LB PLANETARY READ ENDS AND 12 FOOT LOGGING BUNKS AND TRAILER

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Location: Campbell River  

Price: $55,000 Negotiable


RARE GM V12 C/W 13 SPEED ROADRANGER C/W #91000 LB PLANETARY REARS

 

THE FIRST IMAGE IS THE TRUCK FOR SALE - THE REMAING ARE FOR REFERENCE.

 

The Hayes Manufacturing Company Limited was a Vancouver-based Canadian manufacturer of heavy trucks known for their durability and a revolving bunk system. Founded in 1920, Hayes built both highway and off-road trucks, particularly for the logging industry.[1] On a smaller scale, Hayes also manufactured buses. The Signal Company acquired a controlling stake in the company in 1969, and in 1971 renamed it Hayes Trucks. In 1975, Signal sold the company to Paccar, which closed the Hayes plants.

History

SECOND PHOTO OF Hayes-Anderson truck from 1933

The Hayes Manufacturing Company was established in British Columbia in 1920[2] by Douglas Hayes, a parts dealer, and partner W. Anderson from Quadra Island, and was originally the Hayes-Anderson Motor Company Ltd. It was renamed Hayes Manufacturing Company Ltd. in 1928,[2] when the company built a large factory on the False Creek flats in Vancouver. The company eventually had over 600 employees and three plants.

Along with trucks, Hayes manufactured buses, moving vans, tractors and trailers.[2] Its few bus models included the Hayes "Teardrop", a very streamlined design introduced in 1936. Several Teardrop buses were purchased by Pacific Stage Lines,[3] one of which has been preserved by the Transit Museum Society.

The truck hood ornament was a die-cast, chrome-plated, 5-pound bear or a bronze cast bear. The chrome bear was found on the clippers and the bronze was off the square nose logger with butterfly wings. There was also a small bear ornament on each door.[4]

The Signal Company, the parent firm of Mack Trucks, acquired a controlling share in Hayes Manufacturing in 1969. The company was renamed Hayes Trucks in 1975, Signal sold the company to Paccar, which closed the Hayes plants.

Hayes logging

In addition to operating the truck company, the founder's son, Donald Hayes, continued and expanded family logging operations, establishing Hayes Forest Services Limited in 1956. In 2006, Donald P. Hayes, President, and grandson of the founder, proudly accepted the award for being one of Canada's 50 Best Managed Companies - Public or Private.[6]

OWN AND PUT TO WORK A LITTLE BIT OF THE FOLLOWING HISTORY: 

Originally known as the Hayes-Anderson, this was the best-known Canadian West Coast make of truck, and earned its reputation in the logging industry. Hercules, Continental and Leyland engines were used, and production of logging trucks ran at about 100 per year during the 1930s. The company developed a special hitch which permitted trailers to track closely behind their tractors. Models ranged from 1 1/2 to 15 tons, but actual loads often reached 50 tons or more. Another Hayes specialty in the 1930s was that of dockside and warehouse trucks with dropped frames giving a low platform for easy loading, similar in conception to the American Doane trucks. Like the Doanes, the Hayes low­-loaders were very long-lived, many surviving in Vancouver's dockland into the 1960s. Other Hayes products of the 1930s were buses and coaches, some of which were supplied to Greyhound Lines, and tandem-axle conversion sets to make a 5-6 ton 6-wheeler from a Ford Model AA or Chevrolet truck.

In the late 1930s Hayes became British Columbia distributors for Leyland vehicles, rounding out their own range with the British product. They also used an increasing proportion of Leyland components such as engines, axles and transmissions in the trucks, and as these carried a lower tariff" than United States-built components, Hayes vehicles were exceptionally good value. After World War II a line of highway tractors was added, and these were steadily developed during the 1950s and 1960s, along with the logging trucks. Engines used included Rolls-Royce, Cummins, Detroit Diesel and Caterpillar, the largest logging truck, the HDX 1000 using a 430 bhp Detroit Diesel V-12 in conjunction with an Allison 5-speed transmission and Clark rear axle. Buses were no longer made after 1947.

In 1969 Mack acquired a two-thirds interest in Hayes, and continued the range with the addition, in 1970, of the Clipper 100 cab-over-engine highway truck similar to the F series West Coast Macks. These were made in rigid and articulated models, together with the conventional Clipper 200s, the HS series of rigid off-highway trucks including dump trucks, and the HDX logging tractors. These used Detroit Diesel and Caterpillar power. In 1974 Hayes was sold to a subsidiary of Pacific Car & Foundry of Seattle, Washington, and a year later the new owner shut down the operation.


Additional Details

Vehicle Make - Brand Other
Company HAYES HD TRUCKS-
Model OFF ROAD LOGGING TRUCK
Factory or Website Url https://www.facebook.com/HayesTrucks01/
Fuel Type Diesel
Transmission Manual
Condition Heavy or Work Vehicle
Website To Display Url https://www.facebook.com/HayesTrucks01/

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